Far North Aviation at Wick Airport

Far North Aviation at Wick Airport, Scotland is operated by Adrienne and her son Ben. The building is the original control tower that served the No. 18 Group, RAF Coastal Command in WWII. The home base of flying officer Michael F. Suckling spotted the German battleship, Bismarck, from his Supermarine Spitfire. Even the original hangars are still here. Of course, a vintage Land Rover is the transport of choice. Adrienne and Ben have restored a real gem of aviation history.

 

Reykjavik, Iceland

While en route from Iqaluit, Nunavut to Reykjavik, Iceland the Electroair electronic ignitions system partially failed causing a rough running engine. Not what you want over the North Atlantic.   Parts are on the way and should be here Friday, July 9th.

Omar Bjarnason is the technical manager at Flugverk elf and has been very helpful in looking after the plane and getting the repairs done.  If you plan to fly the North Atlantic make sure that you have Omar’s contact info available in case something goes wrong. Reykjavik is a wonderful town and a great place to break down!

After 5 days in Iqaluit, Nunavut N140BV finally made it across Greenland at landed at Reykjavik, Iceland. Approximately 1,200 kt miles with a flight time of 7hrs 40 min.  Icing levels around Iqaluit hover right around 2,500’ so it takes the right day to go. Crossing Greenland is spectacular but had to climb to 17,000’ to clear about 300 miles of icing there. Engine running rough again so down for maintenance in Reykjavik.

Found a great place to visit while my Cirrus awaits parts

Departing Iqaluit

After 5 days in Iqaluit, Nunavut N140BV finally made it across Greenland at landed at Reykjavik, Iceland. Approximately 1,200 kt miles with a flight time of 7hrs 40 min.  Icing levels around Iqaluit hover right around 2,500’ so it takes the right day to go.

Crossing Greenland is spectacular but had to climb to 17,000’ to clear about 300 miles of icing there.

 

Weather Hold in Iqaluit

Exploring Iqaluit’s murals

IQALUIT REPORT

Arrived in Iqaluit on June 30th and have been unable to depart for Iceland due to low clouds and an icing level of 3,000’ or below. The earliest break in the weather looks to be July 5th….

July 2, 2021 – Another day in Iqaluit

Grounded for another day in Iqaluit. A low-pressure trough has moved in over Iqaluit with low ceilings and the icing level dropping to 3,000’.
Also, out of nowhere, a cold front has developed over the east coast of Greenland. Weather changes rapidly in these latitudes. The forecasters always warn to call before departure as the briefing received the night before may not be accurate 12 hours later…

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